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29

Jul

Today in Black History - July 29, 1895

Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin addressed to the First National Conference of Colored Women.  What I see more and more with the early organizations of our ancestors is that they supported each other when it came to social issues.  Now it is done by social workers, laws created by their men and through their courts.  What happens is the destruction of the Black family.  Black women are deem unfit due to issue beyond their control and making.  They are harassed, pressed and stressed until they lose their children.  These organizations by our elder sisters prevented this and supported Black mothers thus supporting her family.  

All Black suffragettes, addressed the issues of Black women.  One of those issues was not the lack of the ability to work.  Black women have worked ever since they touched these shores as slaves, domestics, nurses aides…. while others stayed home. 

Owner : E. Walker

http://www.blackpast.org/1895-josephine-st-pierre-ruffin-address-first-national-conference-colored-women

Today in Black History - July 29, 1895

Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin addressed to the First National Conference of Colored Women.  What I see more and more with the early organizations of our ancestors is that they supported each other when it came to social issues.  Now it is done by social workers, laws created by their men and through their courts.  What happens is the destruction of the Black family.  Black women are deem unfit due to issue beyond their control and making.  They are harassed, pressed and stressed until they lose their children.  These organizations by our elder sisters prevented this and supported Black mothers thus supporting her family.  

All Black suffragettes, addressed the issues of Black women.  One of those issues was not the lack of the ability to work.  Black women have worked ever since they touched these shores as slaves, domestics, nurses aides…. while others stayed home. 

Owner : E. Walker

http://www.blackpast.org/1895-josephine-st-pierre-ruffin-address-first-national-conference-colored-women

28

Jul

Black History - July 16, 1995

Oseola McCarty donated $150,000 to the University of Southern Mississippi, USM to the  Oseola McCarty Scholarship Fund for African American students.   This is what is means to give to your people.  

This is one I have been holding for a couple of months and missed sharing on the 26th. 

Black History - July 16, 1995

Oseola McCarty donated $150,000 to the University of Southern Mississippi, USM to the  Oseola McCarty Scholarship Fund for African American students.   This is what is means to give to your people.  

This is one I have been holding for a couple of months and missed sharing on the 26th. 

27

Jul

Today in Black History - July 27, 1816

After the War of 1812, over three hundred African Americans occupied an abandoned British fort on the banks of the Apalachicola River in what is now Florida. Known as Fort Negro, it was headed by an African American man named Garcia (or Garson). The heavily armed fort became a symbol of Black independence and a threat to the southern slave system. The United States Government made destruction of the fort one of its highest priorities after the war of 1812. In the summer of 1816, the U.S. Navy and Army under Colonel Clinch surrounded Fort Negro and called on the community to surrender, Garcia refused. On July 27, 1816, an attack was launched, but the heavily fortified garrison repelled it. But a second attack succeeded in hitting the ammunition supply, and the fort exploded. Only sixty four of the three hundred African Americans survived the blast, and only three of the sixty four were uninjured. Garcia, unhurt was executed by firing squad. The remaining survivors were returned to slavery.

The War of 1812 was between the Canada, the British their Native American allies against the newly declared United States of America.  Also included were Black Loyalist.  These were freedmen and slaves who pledge allegiance to the British Empire and/or Canada.  It was sort of an enemy of my enemy is my friend.  Those who were slaves were promised freedom for fighting in the War of 1812.  Those who were freed fought to maintain their freedom.  Both were promised land.  As with many promises of freedom including in this story, the promise did not come to full fruition.  Some were already residents of Canada and had come to fight in the War of 1812.   After the War of 1812, many left for Canada to seek this, another promise of forty acres and a mule. 

Canada kept its independence with a win of a war that included the burning down of the first White House.  

http://www.exploresouthernhistory.com/fortgadsden4.html

Today in Black History - July 27, 1816

After the War of 1812, over three hundred African Americans occupied an abandoned British fort on the banks of the Apalachicola River in what is now Florida. Known as Fort Negro, it was headed by an African American man named Garcia (or Garson). The heavily armed fort became a symbol of Black independence and a threat to the southern slave system. The United States Government made destruction of the fort one of its highest priorities after the war of 1812. In the summer of 1816, the U.S. Navy and Army under Colonel Clinch surrounded Fort Negro and called on the community to surrender, Garcia refused. On July 27, 1816, an attack was launched, but the heavily fortified garrison repelled it. But a second attack succeeded in hitting the ammunition supply, and the fort exploded. Only sixty four of the three hundred African Americans survived the blast, and only three of the sixty four were uninjured. Garcia, unhurt was executed by firing squad. The remaining survivors were returned to slavery.

The War of 1812 was between the Canada, the British their Native American allies against the newly declared United States of America.  Also included were Black Loyalist.  These were freedmen and slaves who pledge allegiance to the British Empire and/or Canada.  It was sort of an enemy of my enemy is my friend.  Those who were slaves were promised freedom for fighting in the War of 1812.  Those who were freed fought to maintain their freedom.  Both were promised land.  As with many promises of freedom including in this story, the promise did not come to full fruition.  Some were already residents of Canada and had come to fight in the War of 1812.   After the War of 1812, many left for Canada to seek this, another promise of forty acres and a mule. 

Canada kept its independence with a win of a war that included the burning down of the first White House.  

http://www.exploresouthernhistory.com/fortgadsden4.html

26

Jul

Today in Black History - July 26, 1947

Happy Independence Day to the Republic of Liberia.  The Republic of Liberia became an independent nation, following its founding in 1822 by the American Colonization Society as a place to send free African Americans from the U.S., by authority of a charter granted by the U.S. Congress in 1816.   

In 1821, The American Colonization Society (ACS) dispatched a representative, Dr. Eli Ayres, to purchase land farther north up the coast from Sierra Leone. With the aid of a U.S. naval officer, Lieutenant Robert F. Stockton, Ayres cruised the coastal waters west of Grand Bassa seeking out appropriate lands for the colony. Stockton took charge of the negotiations with leaders of the Dey and Bassa peoples who lived in the area of Cape Mesurado. At first, the local leaders were reluctant to surrender their peoples’ land to the strangers, but were forcefully persuaded — some accounts say at gun-point — to part with a “36 mile long and 3 mile wide” strip of coastal land for trade goods, supplies, weapons, and rum worth approximately $300. See “The fourth annual report of the American Society for Colonizing the Free People of Color of the United States: with an appendix.”

February 4, 1822, free American Blacks settled Liberia, West Africa. The first group of colonists landed in Liberia and founded Monrovia, the colony’s capital city, named in honor of President James Monroe.

On July 26, 1947, The Liberian Declaration of Independence was adopted and signed. In it, Liberians charged their mother country, the United States, with injustices that made it necessary for them to leave and make new lives for themselves in Africa. They called upon the international community to recognize the independence and sovereignty of Liberia. Britain was one of the first nations to recognize the new country. The United States did not recognize Liberia until the American Civil War.

http://aglobalworld.com/holidays-around-the-world/liberia-independence-day/

http://www.ultimatehistoryproject.com/liberia.html

Today in Black History - July 26, 1947

Happy Independence Day to the Republic of Liberia.  The Republic of Liberia became an independent nation, following its founding in 1822 by the American Colonization Society as a place to send free African Americans from the U.S., by authority of a charter granted by the U.S. Congress in 1816.   

In 1821, The American Colonization Society (ACS) dispatched a representative, Dr. Eli Ayres, to purchase land farther north up the coast from Sierra Leone. With the aid of a U.S. naval officer, Lieutenant Robert F. Stockton, Ayres cruised the coastal waters west of Grand Bassa seeking out appropriate lands for the colony. Stockton took charge of the negotiations with leaders of the Dey and Bassa peoples who lived in the area of Cape Mesurado. At first, the local leaders were reluctant to surrender their peoples’ land to the strangers, but were forcefully persuaded — some accounts say at gun-point — to part with a “36 mile long and 3 mile wide” strip of coastal land for trade goods, supplies, weapons, and rum worth approximately $300. See “The fourth annual report of the American Society for Colonizing the Free People of Color of the United States: with an appendix.”

February 4, 1822, free American Blacks settled Liberia, West Africa. The first group of colonists landed in Liberia and founded Monrovia, the colony’s capital city, named in honor of President James Monroe.

On July 26, 1947, The Liberian Declaration of Independence was adopted and signed. In it, Liberians charged their mother country, the United States, with injustices that made it necessary for them to leave and make new lives for themselves in Africa. They called upon the international community to recognize the independence and sovereignty of Liberia. Britain was one of the first nations to recognize the new country. The United States did not recognize Liberia until the American Civil War.

http://aglobalworld.com/holidays-around-the-world/liberia-independence-day/

http://www.ultimatehistoryproject.com/liberia.html