Esquire Theme by Matthew Buchanan
Social icons by Tim van Damme

27

Aug

Today in Black History - August 27, 1991

Central Life Insurance Company, the last surviving African American owned insurance company in the state of Florida is ordered liquidated by a Florida circuit court judge.  Central Life Insurance Company of Florida filed as a Domestic for Profit Corporation in the State of Florida and is no longer active. This corporate entity was filed approximately ninety-two years ago on Thursday, April 13, 1922 as recorded in documents filed with Florida Department of State.

There was a time when a list of the largest Black owned businesses would be headed by Black owned insurance companies  Historically we were not allowed to purchase through other insurance companies.  We did a “so what” and opened our own as should be.  Yet in the 1960’s when trying to prove something, we abandoned these companies as others saw our spending power.  Like the Negro League, the desire for acceptance has left Black owned insurance companies to be “no more.”

http://www.sptimes.com/2003/01/10/Floridian/Beyond_racial_boundar.shtml

Today in Black History - August 27, 1991

Central Life Insurance Company, the last surviving African American owned insurance company in the state of Florida is ordered liquidated by a Florida circuit court judge.  Central Life Insurance Company of Florida filed as a Domestic for Profit Corporation in the State of Florida and is no longer active. This corporate entity was filed approximately ninety-two years ago on Thursday, April 13, 1922 as recorded in documents filed with Florida Department of State.

There was a time when a list of the largest Black owned businesses would be headed by Black owned insurance companies  Historically we were not allowed to purchase through other insurance companies.  We did a “so what” and opened our own as should be.  Yet in the 1960’s when trying to prove something, we abandoned these companies as others saw our spending power.  Like the Negro League, the desire for acceptance has left Black owned insurance companies to be “no more.”

http://www.sptimes.com/2003/01/10/Floridian/Beyond_racial_boundar.shtml

A Soninke woman paints the wall of her house in Djajibine, Mauritania
Photo by Margaret Courtney-Clarke

A Soninke woman paints the wall of her house in Djajibine, Mauritania
Photo by Margaret Courtney-Clarke

26

Aug

Playing catch-up with the competition can only ever help you make incremental gains. It will never help you create something new.

It’s important to understand what’s going on around you, but the best way to stay ahead is a laser focus on building great products that people need.

#howgoogleworks #innovation

www.HowGoogleWorks.net

Playing catch-up with the competition can only ever help you make incremental gains. It will never help you create something new.

It’s important to understand what’s going on around you, but the best way to stay ahead is a laser focus on building great products that people need.

#howgoogleworks #innovation

www.HowGoogleWorks.net

Today in Black History - August 26, 1843

Norbert Rillieux of New Orleans, Louisiana was granted patent number 3237 for the multiple-effect evaporation system for refining sugar. His invention addressed all of the shortcomings of prior sugar refining processes and by 1849 thirteen Louisiana sugar factories were using his invention. His invention was an important development in the growth of the sugar industry. Rillieux was born March 17, 1806 in New Orleans, Louisiana. As a Creole from a prominent family, he had access to education and privileges not available to many other Black people. In the early 1820s, he traveled to Paris to attend the prestigious Ecole Centrale, studying physics, mechanics, and engineering. He became an expert in steam engines and published several papers about the use of steam to work devices. At the age of 24, Rillieux became the youngest teacher at Ecole Centrale. While in France, Rillieux started researching ways to improve the sugar refining process and after returning to the United States in 1833 began to develop the machine for which he was granted the patent. In the 1850s, Rillieux presented a plan to the government of New Orleans to eliminate the moist breeding grounds for the mosquitoes that were causing a Yellow Fever outbreak. His plan was turned down. Several years later, as the Yellow Fever outbreak continued, the city accepted a plan from White engineers that was similar to the plan proposed by Rillieux. In the late 1850s, Rillieux returned to France where he died October 8, 1894. - thewright.org

Today in Black History - August 26, 1843

Norbert Rillieux of New Orleans, Louisiana was granted patent number 3237 for the multiple-effect evaporation system for refining sugar. His invention addressed all of the shortcomings of prior sugar refining processes and by 1849 thirteen Louisiana sugar factories were using his invention. His invention was an important development in the growth of the sugar industry. Rillieux was born March 17, 1806 in New Orleans, Louisiana. As a Creole from a prominent family, he had access to education and privileges not available to many other Black people. In the early 1820s, he traveled to Paris to attend the prestigious Ecole Centrale, studying physics, mechanics, and engineering. He became an expert in steam engines and published several papers about the use of steam to work devices. At the age of 24, Rillieux became the youngest teacher at Ecole Centrale. While in France, Rillieux started researching ways to improve the sugar refining process and after returning to the United States in 1833 began to develop the machine for which he was granted the patent. In the 1850s, Rillieux presented a plan to the government of New Orleans to eliminate the moist breeding grounds for the mosquitoes that were causing a Yellow Fever outbreak. His plan was turned down. Several years later, as the Yellow Fever outbreak continued, the city accepted a plan from White engineers that was similar to the plan proposed by Rillieux. In the late 1850s, Rillieux returned to France where he died October 8, 1894. - thewright.org